Haven 12.5 Project in Franklin

We are busy planning the next Australian Wooden Boat Festival, and we hit the ground running after the Christmas break.  There’s a lot of work to do, as the featured nation this time around is the USA and they have reacted to our invitation like long-lost friends. We’ve already got an brilliant line-up of wooden boat stars ready to present at the festival.

One of them is Sean Koomen, chief instructor at the North West School of Wooden Boat Building in Port Townsend, Washington.  Sean will bring a team of graduate students out to build a Haven 12.5, a classic American design originally by Herreshoff, modified by Joel White.  Joel’s son, Steve White, will be on the team.  They will build the boat at the Wooden Boat Centre in Franklin, with the same sort of time-frame as the Dutch boat building project on 2017.  This project will generate a huge amount of interest in North America.

Chief instructor Sean Koomen at the NWSWBB

Sean is eager to get his hands on the Hydrowood reclaimed-timber celery top pine. Dutch boat builder Bert van Baar gave it a rave review after building the smart BM16 at the Wooden Boat Centre in Franklin.  ‘Smooth, cuts like butter, fine finish’, he said.

Hydrowood has agreed to be involved again in 2019, which has everyone smiling.  Anne Holst, manager of the Wooden Boat Centre has generously offered to provide space and access to tools.  ‘There will be opportunities for locals to get involved in the build’ she reports.  The town of Franklin is the perfect location for international guests to get a taste of real Tasmanian hospitality and our fascination with wooden boats. The vessel is expected to be on site for the MyState Australian Wooden Boat Festival and will be auctioned to support this free, public event on Hobart’s beautiful waterfront.

 

Chairman’s Message

Believe it or not, it is now just under 12 months to the next MyState Australian Wooden Boat Festival, in 2019!

We recently held our first-round of production meetings, volunteer recruitment, and other meetings necessary to start not only the planning for the event, but its development. Many volunteers are needed to create it, and if you would like to get involved, please contact the Australian Wooden Boat Festival Inc office – we would love to hear from you!

And of course, a wooden boat festival would not be a wooden boat festival without wooden boats – and I know that there are a huge number of boat owners, and their crews, who will be planning to come to the festival, and to take part in what is a truly wonderful event. So, to all of you, start painting and varnishing, whipping those rope ends, tidying up some splices and running rigging, and hopefully we will see you at the festival!

Whilst there is an enormous amount of work that goes into creating the festival, it is also a very costly exercise. We are a not-for-profit organisation, and almost all of the people involved in the operation and running of the event do so on a volunteer basis. Despite all the good will from our supporters and volunteers, the fact of the matter is that it would not happen, or at least in the form that it is, without the generous support of all our sponsors and donors. Whilst of course thanking our supporters generally, and in particular the Tasmanian Government through Events Tasmania, I am thrilled to announce that MyState has again come on board as our naming rights sponsor, and so to formally announce that the next festival will be the “MyState Australian Wooden Boat Festival, 2019”! We are very grateful for the now long term and ongoing support from MyState, a wonderful Tasmanian financial institution. It is great to see that MyState is prepared to support a community event like ours, and to help give enjoyment to so many people!

And a final word about the MyState Australian Wooden Boat Festival 2019 – if you are travelling from outside Hobart, and need to book flights, sea travel, and/or accommodation – do so as soon as possible, otherwise you might miss out. We do not want that – we would love to see you all come along and join us!

Steve Knight

Chairman

Maori Lass Gets Some Attention

Maori Lass

Our long-serving Dock Master, Ross Barnett, is a man who knows a thing or two about wooden boats. He’d restored enough of them, God knows, and there probably isn’t a piner’s punt in Tasmania he’s not on first-name terms with. So when he decided that his beloved Maori Lass needed a polish up for her 70th birthday (this is not the beloved Mrs. B, you understand, but a 30’ compact offshore cruiser built in Hobart in 1948), he should have known what he was in for. Roscoe did know enough to enlist the services of master shipwright Terry Lean to ‘replace a few ribs under and astern of the engine and give it a lick of paint around the topsides. Six weeks, eight at the most.’

Captain Crusty gets to work

We know, dear reader, we know. You have already laid your head to one side and adopted a knowing look. Stand by, they’re going to lift Maori Lass out of the water and put her into the Gardners Bay shed once occupied by the fabled Wilson Brothers, creators of Varg and many other superb Tasmanian boats. Terry Lean will be in charge, assisted by Captain Crusty (aka Ross Barnett) in the part-time project to complete the tune-up.

Terry has the runs on the board, having worked on the restoration of the Kathleen Gillett (now in pride of place at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney) and the Jock Muir boat Lahara. Trained at Halvorsen and Gowland, he was shipwright and charge hand for Halvorsen Boats at Bobbin Head, then for Beashel’s in Pittwater before moving to Tasmania and taking up the position of principal tutor and boat builder at the Wooden Boat Centre on the shores of the Franklin River. Terry, who is also a qualified marine surveyor, continues to practice his traditional trade, with many notable boats to his credit.

Remind me, Terry, where does this bit go?

Maori Lass was designed by HE Cox and built by fellow New Zealander Ron Andrewartha with the help of his two sons, Tom and Bob. The two Kiwi gentlemen took Mrs Trewartha’s advice and christened the boat with an appropriate name. Built from Tasmanian blue gum keel and ribs with celery top pine planking, she was designed for true ocean sailing. The boat has proved herself well up to that task, having spent considerable time in Sydney, the Great Barrier Reef, Darwin and around the world via Singapore, the Suez Canal, Panama Canal and across the Pacific.

Mrs. B. has just told Terry and Ross they can go home now, it’s 6:00pm.

We caught up with Ross here in the AWBF office recently to see how things were going:

AWBF:   So, Roscoe, having started the re-fit back in September, how is that 6 week project coming along?

RB:    Have you seen the state of those ribs? It’s like a jungle in there! Christmas. We should be done by Christmas. Well, soon after Christmas, anyway.

AWBF:   That’s OK, Roscoe, but the next festival is just 13 months away. Do you reckon you’ll be clear by then? We need our Dock Master back, after all.

RB:        Leave it with me. (walks away with a limp where his wallet used to be)